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The infamous "Baby Louie" embryo is a giant oviraptorosaur fossil from China that resembled a gargantuan bird.

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image: Polio Vaccine Pioneer Dies

Polio Vaccine Pioneer Dies

By | May 2, 2017

Julius Youngner collaborated with Jonas Salk on the polio vaccine, and later identified interferon gamma and contributed to an equine influenza vaccine.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Flavor</em>

Book Excerpt from Flavor

By | May 1, 2017

Author Bob Holmes dove into the taste-determining realm of his genome.

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image: Computers That Can Smell

Computers That Can Smell

By | May 1, 2017

Teams of modelers compete to develop algorithms for estimating how people will perceive a particular odor from its molecular characteristics.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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image: Learning Your Stripes

Learning Your Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Science’s lowest common denominator has always been patterns.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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image: Understanding Body Ownership and Agency

Understanding Body Ownership and Agency

By | May 1, 2017

Understanding how people recognize and control their own bodies could help researchers develop therapies for those who’ve lost their sense of self.

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