The Scientist

» peer review and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

By | September 27, 2017

Adding or removing water changes how stem cells differentiate.

0 Comments

image: CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

By | September 20, 2017

OCT4 is necessary for blastocyst formation in the human embryo, researchers report.

0 Comments

A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

0 Comments

image: Do Preprints Require More Rigorous Screening?

Do Preprints Require More Rigorous Screening?

By | August 1, 2017

Two manuscripts published without methods point to the importance of community policing on preprint archives.

2 Comments

image: Peer-Review Fraud Scheme Uncovered in China

Peer-Review Fraud Scheme Uncovered in China

By | July 31, 2017

The Chinese government finds almost 500 researchers guilty of misconduct in relation to a recent spate of retractions from a cancer journal.

1 Comment

image: PubPeer Launches Updated Site

PubPeer Launches Updated Site

By | June 19, 2017

New features include increased security of user anonymity.

0 Comments

Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: The Frustrating Process of Manuscript Submission

Opinion: The Frustrating Process of Manuscript Submission

By and | May 10, 2017

We suggest a centralized facility for submitting to journals—one that would benefit scientists and not only publishers.

3 Comments

The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

3 Comments

Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  2. Two Dozen House Republicans Do an About-Face on Tuition Tax
  3. 2017 Top 10 Innovations
    Features 2017 Top 10 Innovations

    From single-cell analysis to whole-genome sequencing, this year’s best new products shine on many levels.

  4. The Biggest DNA Origami Structures Yet
    Daily News The Biggest DNA Origami Structures Yet

    Three new strategies for using DNA to generate large, self-assembling shapes create everything from a nanoscale teddy bear to a nanoscale Mona Lisa.

FreeShip