The Scientist

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

1 Comment

image: New Journal Scrutinizes the Research Process

New Journal Scrutinizes the Research Process

By | May 3, 2016

Studies in Research Integrity and Peer Review analyze ethics and quality in both science and publishing.

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image: Opinion: Reimagining the Paper

Opinion: Reimagining the Paper

By | May 2, 2016

Breaking down lengthy, narrative-driven biomedical articles into brief reports on singular observations or experiments could increase reproducibility and accessibility in the literature.

3 Comments

image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

1 Comment

image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

1 Comment

image: NIH Grant Reviews Don’t Predict Success

NIH Grant Reviews Don’t Predict Success

By | February 18, 2016

Peer reviewers’ assessments of funding proposals to the National Institutes of Health don’t correlate well with later publication citations, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

By | December 23, 2015

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

2 Comments

image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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