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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2014

The Sixth Extinction, Joy, Guilt, Anger, Love, Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why, and Ten Thousand Birds

1 Comment

image: Is Earth Special?

Is Earth Special?

By | March 1, 2014

Reconsidering the uniqueness of life on our planet

8 Comments

image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch

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image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.

2 Comments

image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

2 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Buddhist Biology</em>

Book Excerpt from Buddhist Biology

By | February 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “A Science Sutra,” author David Barash describes how the ancient philosophy might form the perfect link between science and religion.

11 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2014

Me, Myself, and Why, RedDevil 4, Neanderthal Man, and Science from Sight to Insight

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

By | January 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “The Green Web,” author Alan de Queiroz describes the evolutionary journey taken by a South American species of sundew plant.

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