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image: The Narcissistic Scientist

The Narcissistic Scientist

By | October 1, 2016

Are leading researchers driven more by the quest for knowledge or the pursuit of fame?

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image: Genes Linked to Dogs’ Sociability with People

Genes Linked to Dogs’ Sociability with People

By | September 30, 2016

Genetic variants on chromosome 26 appears to play a role in a dog’s tendency to turn to people for help.

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image: Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

By | September 28, 2016

Researchers identify aspects of the patient, the virus, and the infection itself that influence whether a person with HIV will produce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

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The National Institutes of Health is hosting a two-day conference on how the virus affects infants and children. The take-home message so far: microcephaly is but one of many potential problems for Zika-exposed fetuses.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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Matching the immunological characteristics of donor retinal cells to those of the recipient can reduce the chance of rejection.

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image: Neonatal Gut Bacteria Might Promote Asthma

Neonatal Gut Bacteria Might Promote Asthma

By | September 12, 2016

Byproducts of gut microbes in some 1-month–old babies trigger inflammation that is linked to later asthma development, researchers find.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: Designing In Vitro Models of the Blood-Brain Barrier

Designing In Vitro Models of the Blood-Brain Barrier

By | September 1, 2016

Choosing the right model, be it 3-D or 2-D, requires wading through varied cell sources, cell types, and cell culture conditions.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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