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image: Turmoil at Brazilian Research Center

Turmoil at Brazilian Research Center

By Jef Akst | August 9, 2011

More than 100 researchers have left a neuroscience institute in Brazil in the last couple of weeks, protesting managerial problems they say are thwarting their work.

21 Comments

image: Rats Don't Map Altitude

Rats Don't Map Altitude

By Jef Akst | August 8, 2011

Rat neurons only weakly respond as the animals climbed upwards, suggesting the brain's map of the environment doesn't account for altitude.

9 Comments

image: UK Reforms Copyright Laws

UK Reforms Copyright Laws

By Jef Akst | August 4, 2011

The United Kingdom is revamping its intellectual property laws for published research.

6 Comments

image: How Vampire Bats Find Veins

How Vampire Bats Find Veins

By Jessica P. Johnson | August 4, 2011

Heat-sensing protein channels in vampire bats allow the flying mammals to find the best place to sink their teeth into their prey.

12 Comments

image: Science Education Shift

Science Education Shift

By Megan Scudellari | August 3, 2011

A new educational framework swaps breadth of scientific disciplines for depth and emphasizes the process of science.

11 Comments

image: Estrogen’s New Role

Estrogen’s New Role

By Jessica P. Johnson | August 2, 2011

The well-studied hormone functions as a neurotransmitter in the brains of zebra finches.

0 Comments

In Chapter 6, "Research and Teaching at the All-Administrative University," author Benjamin Ginsberg describes the perils of pursuing scholarship and teaching in the industrial environment of today's American institutions of higher learning.

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image: Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

By Tom Curran | August 1, 2011

Sequencing the DNA of individual neurons is a way to dissect the genes underlying major neurological and psychological disorders.

6 Comments

image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By Richard D. Bardgett | August 1, 2011

As the planet warms plant growth will likely increase—locking up some of that extra carbon dioxide by converting it into vegetative biomass—but that’s not the whole story. 

0 Comments

image: The Root of the Problem

The Root of the Problem

By Richard D. Bardgett | August 1, 2011

New research suggests that the flow of carbon through plants to underground ecosystems may be crucial to how the environment responds to climate change.

18 Comments

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