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Rather than getting a gene for its original function, a horizontal gene transfer provides the raw material for evolutionary innovation.

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Drug-free environments, such as a designated ward in a hospital, might reduce the strength of selection for resistance.

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image: Image of the Day: Ant Attack!

Image of the Day: Ant Attack!

By The Scientist Staff | April 24, 2018

A new species of ant discovered in Borneo fends off invaders with a uniquely suicidal strategy.

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image: Image of the Day: Cell Droplets

Image of the Day: Cell Droplets

By The Scientist Staff | April 4, 2018

Proteins and RNA aggregate into “membraneless organelles” due to liquid-liquid phase separation.

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image: Macrophages Play a Double Role in Cancer

Macrophages Play a Double Role in Cancer

By Amanda B. Keener | April 1, 2018

Macrophages play numerous roles within tumors, leaving cancer researchers with a choice: eliminate the cells or recruit them.

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image: Image of the Day: Flock of Algae

Image of the Day: Flock of Algae

By The Scientist Staff | March 21, 2018

Volvox barberi actively organize themselves into large colonies that optimize space.

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image: Many Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect Gut Bacteria

Many Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect Gut Bacteria

By Catherine Offord | March 20, 2018

A new study finds that more than 200 human-targeted, non-antibiotic drugs inhibit the growth of bacterial species that make up part of the human microbiome.

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image: Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

By Ruth Williams | March 15, 2018

A device dubbed the “mother machine” enables real-time observation of mutagenesis in single bacterial cells.  

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image: Image of the Day: Living Color

Image of the Day: Living Color

By The Scientist Staff | March 8, 2018

Biodegradable pigments could be custom-grown by bacteria in the future, say researchers.  

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image: Hungry Macrophages Keep Tattoos on Mice’s Skin

Hungry Macrophages Keep Tattoos on Mice’s Skin

By Diana Kwon | March 7, 2018

A new study reveals that a constant stream of ink-gobbling immune cells helps hold tattoos in place.

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