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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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image: Bioethicist and Law Professor Dies

Bioethicist and Law Professor Dies

By | July 6, 2017

John Robertson was known for his contributions to reproductive medicine ethics and for solidifying the scholarly connection between biomedicine and law.

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image: Crystallography Innovator Dies

Crystallography Innovator Dies

By | June 26, 2017

Philip Coppens, who developed photocrystallography, has passed away at age 86.

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image: Distinguished Autism Researcher Dies

Distinguished Autism Researcher Dies

By | June 13, 2017

A child neurologist, Isabelle Rapin popularized the notion that autism was part of a spectrum of disorders.

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Behave</em>

Book Excerpt from Behave

By | June 1, 2017

In the book’s introduction, author and neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky explains his fascination with the biology of violence and other dark parts of human behavior.

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The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

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image: Former Head of Genzyme Dies

Former Head of Genzyme Dies

By | May 15, 2017

Henri Termeer helped usher the biotech company into an industry behemoth.

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image: Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

By | May 15, 2017

Men have traditionally stolen the spotlight as scientific popularizers on TV, but women are making names for themselves in other formats.

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