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An internal investigation has revealed why the $8.8 million Purdue University study was abruptly terminated earlier this year. 

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Maintaining dynamic connections among the body’s mitochondria is required for the health and life-extending benefits of low-calorie diets for nematodes.

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image: Hormone Loss Prevents Obesity and Diabetes in Mice

Hormone Loss Prevents Obesity and Diabetes in Mice

By | November 6, 2017

Asprosin—involved in a rare disease called neonatal progeroid syndrome—targets neurons to stimulate appetite, and blocking the hormone wards off weight gain in rodents.

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image: Pesticide Residues Linked to Unsuccessful IVF

Pesticide Residues Linked to Unsuccessful IVF

By | October 30, 2017

Women who ate more produce known to harbor pesticides were less likely to succeed with fertility treatment than women who ate fewer of these fruits and vegetables.

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image: A Molecule to Treat Obesity?

A Molecule to Treat Obesity?

By | October 18, 2017

GDF-15 lowers body weight in mice and primates.

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image: Studies: Ketogenic Mice Live Longer, Healthier Lives

Studies: Ketogenic Mice Live Longer, Healthier Lives

By | September 5, 2017

High-fat, low-carbohydrate diets are shown to increase lifespan and preserve memory in two independent mouse experiments.

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image: Hunter-gatherer Microbiomes Cycle with the Seasons

Hunter-gatherer Microbiomes Cycle with the Seasons

By | August 24, 2017

The composition of the gut microbiota varies by time of year and is more diverse than that of industrialized groups.

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image: Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

By | June 1, 2017

Fruit flies and mice grow better and eat less when the amino acid balance of their food reflects that coded by their exomes.

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image: Micronutrients, Macro Impact

Micronutrients, Macro Impact

By | June 1, 2017

At the interface of food, nutrition, and agriculture, Lindsay Allen’s research has been informing nutrition guidelines and policies around the world for decades.

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image: Running on Empty

Running on Empty

By | June 1, 2017

Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

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