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image: Burn Victims Produce Brown Fat

Burn Victims Produce Brown Fat

By Kerry Grens | August 7, 2015

Following extreme trauma, patients’ adipose samples have revealed—for the first time in humans—that white fat can be converted into energy-burning brown fat.

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image: Resveratrol’s Low-Dose Anticancer Effect

Resveratrol’s Low-Dose Anticancer Effect

By Bob Grant | July 31, 2015

The antioxidant found in red wine and some berries shows that small doses have more potent antitumor effects than large doses in a mouse model.


image: The Death Toll Tied to Sweet Drinks

The Death Toll Tied to Sweet Drinks

By Kerry Grens | July 1, 2015

Annually, about 184,000 deaths annually are linked to drinking sugary beverages, according to a new study.


image: Periodic Fasting Improves Rodent Health

Periodic Fasting Improves Rodent Health

By Kerry Grens | June 18, 2015

And a diet that includes a few days of caloric restriction each month reduces biomarkers of aging and disease in people, according to a small trial.


image: Metabolic Memory

Metabolic Memory

By Jenny Rood | April 8, 2015

Drosophila develop preferences for healthy foods that can be disrupted by overfeeding, a study suggests.


image: Drug Spurs Digestion

Drug Spurs Digestion

By Jef Akst | January 6, 2015

A new drug shows promise as a weight-loss solution in mice, prompting the animals to burn calories in the absence of a meal.


image: Great Ape Microbiomes

Great Ape Microbiomes

By Tracy Vence | November 6, 2014

Chimpanzees, bonobos, and gorillas harbor more microbial diversity in their guts than do humans, a study shows.


image: Dinos on Special Diets

Dinos on Special Diets

By Molly Sharlach | October 9, 2014

Skull structures suggest that sauropod dinosaur species subsisted on different plant types.


image: Gestational Malnutrition Affects Offspring’s Sperm

Gestational Malnutrition Affects Offspring’s Sperm

By Anna Azvolinsky | July 10, 2014

Mice undernourished during pregnancy can transmit the effects of such nutritional stress to their sons’ germ cells, epigenetically.  


image: Omnivore Ancestors?

Omnivore Ancestors?

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | June 26, 2014

Fifty-thousand-year-old feces suggest Neanderthals ate both meat and vegetables.


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