The Scientist

» biofilm and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

0 Comments

image: Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

By | September 27, 2017

Adding or removing water changes how stem cells differentiate.

0 Comments

image: CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

CRISPR Used in Human Embryos to Probe Gene Function

By | September 20, 2017

OCT4 is necessary for blastocyst formation in the human embryo, researchers report.

0 Comments

A study of a simple marine animal suggests that the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians may have had three germ layers instead of two.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Fungal Fireworks

Image of the Day: Fungal Fireworks

By | June 26, 2017

The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus begins to grow biofilms as it develops into a larger intertwined network.

0 Comments

Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: 3-Billion-Year-Old Bubbles 

Image of the Day: 3-Billion-Year-Old Bubbles 

By | May 10, 2017

Fossilized gas bubbles, formed from being trapped by microbial biofilms, provide the oldest signature of life in terrestrial hot springs.

0 Comments

The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

3 Comments

Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Scientists Continue to Use Outdated Methods
  2. Secret Eugenics Conference Uncovered at University College London
  3. Like Humans, Walruses and Bats Cuddle Infants on Their Left Sides
  4. How Do Infant Immune Systems Learn to Tolerate Gut Bacteria?
AAAS