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image: HHS Partners on Ebola Drug

HHS Partners on Ebola Drug

By | July 22, 2015

The US Department of Health and Human Services will put nearly $20 million toward the development of an Ebola drug as Tekmira steps out of the space.

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image: “Feathered Poodle From Hell” Dino Found

“Feathered Poodle From Hell” Dino Found

By | July 20, 2015

A newly discovered relative of Velociraptor had abundant plumage and birdlike wings.  

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image: Underground Immunity

Underground Immunity

By | July 16, 2015

Arabidopsis thaliana defense hormones shape the plant’s root microbiome. 

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image: Microbiome Teams Up Against <em>C. diff</em>

Microbiome Teams Up Against C. diff

By | July 14, 2015

Researchers build a mathematical model that can predict whether a mouse will be infected by Clostridium difficile based on the microbes found in its GI tract.

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image: Evolution of Kin Discrimination

Evolution of Kin Discrimination

By | July 6, 2015

A bacterium’s ability to distinguish self from non-self can arise spontaneously, a study shows, reigniting questions of whether the trait can be considered an adaptation.

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image: MERS Help on the Horizon?

MERS Help on the Horizon?

By | July 1, 2015

New research finds that a treatment for Middle East respiratory syndrome can prevent and treat the disease in mice, while an experimental vaccine moves into human testing.

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image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.

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image: High-Flying Ducks

High-Flying Ducks

By | July 1, 2015

Five species of waterfowl have evolved a variety of adaptations to adjust to the high altitude of South America’s Lake Titicaca.

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image: How to Make a New Species

How to Make a New Species

By | July 1, 2015

Scientists mutate a mating pheromone and its corresponding receptor in yeast to promote speciation.

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image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.

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