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image: Second-Ever ALS Drug Approved

Second-Ever ALS Drug Approved

By | May 8, 2017

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients in the U.S. now have an option besides riluzole, which was approved by the FDA more than two decades ago and only extends life by two or three months.

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image: Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

By | May 3, 2017

A heat block, a truck battery, and a novel RNA amplification assay make for in-the-field surveillance of the virus.

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image: Infographic: Proteasome Basics

Infographic: Proteasome Basics

By | May 1, 2017

The structure and function of the cell's protein-degrading machine

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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image: Drugs OKed Faster in U.S. Than in Europe

Drugs OKed Faster in U.S. Than in Europe

By | April 10, 2017

In recent years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved more drugs and in less time than the European Medicines Agency.

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At the annual American Association for Cancer Research meeting, researchers discuss the importance of understanding the epigenetic contributors to cancer progression and treatment response.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

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image: Location, Location, Location

Location, Location, Location

By | April 1, 2017

Since first proposing that a cell’s function and biology depend on its surroundings, Mina Bissell continues to probe the role of the extracellular matrix.

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image: Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

By | April 1, 2017

Following a spate of patient deaths in clinical trials testing modified T cells for the treatment of cancer, researchers work to reduce the treatment’s toxicity without sacrificing efficacy.

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