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image: Chemogenetics Doesn’t Work Like Many Thought

Chemogenetics Doesn’t Work Like Many Thought

By | August 4, 2017

A study finds the so-called DREADD method of manipulating neurons using a drug called CNO actually works via clozapine.

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image: Right-to-Try Bill Passes the Senate

Right-to-Try Bill Passes the Senate

By | August 4, 2017

The legislation removes restrictions for seriously ill patients to access experimental treatments that have not received FDA approval.

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The genomes of two species of water bears reveal clues about how they persist in extreme conditions, yet don’t resolve the animals’ debated evolutionary story.

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image: Dogs with Duchenne Treated with Gene Therapy

Dogs with Duchenne Treated with Gene Therapy

By | July 25, 2017

Researchers restored muscle function in animals with muscular dystrophy.

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A cardiovascular surgeon’s research was rejected for publication because it referenced evolutionary theory, Turkish outlets report, while the university at the center of the tumult claims the story is false. 

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Their waters served as refuges during ice ages, allowing for adaptation and the emergence of new species.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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The presence of similar light-emitting enzymes in the distantly related organisms lends new insight into bioluminescence evolution.

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image: Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

By | July 5, 2017

Mitochondrial DNA in Neanderthal bone suggests humans first left Africa earlier than previously thought.

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