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The antibodies bind conserved viral parts, allowing them to neutralize all five Ebola types.

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image: Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

Science Celebrities: Where Are the Women?

By | May 15, 2017

Men have traditionally stolen the spotlight as scientific popularizers on TV, but women are making names for themselves in other formats.

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New research provides evidence that the ancient hominin species might not be so ancient after all.

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The infamous "Baby Louie" embryo is a giant oviraptorosaur fossil from China that resembled a gargantuan bird.

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image: Second-Ever ALS Drug Approved

Second-Ever ALS Drug Approved

By | May 8, 2017

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients in the U.S. now have an option besides riluzole, which was approved by the FDA more than two decades ago and only extends life by two or three months.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Flavor</em>

Book Excerpt from Flavor

By | May 1, 2017

Author Bob Holmes dove into the taste-determining realm of his genome.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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image: Learning Your Stripes

Learning Your Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Science’s lowest common denominator has always been patterns.

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image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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