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image: Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

Ancient Marine Reptile Birthed Live Young

By | February 15, 2017

Researchers have described a pregnant Dinochephalosaurus, and the fossilized remains suggest that the massive animal did not lay eggs, as previously suspected.

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Speciation and development of new traits may not always go hand-in-hand.

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image: Science Teaching Standards up for Revision in Texas

Science Teaching Standards up for Revision in Texas

By | February 9, 2017

Despite a committee of educators recommending the removal of language challenging evolution in science curricula, state education board members vote to reintroduce controversial concepts. 

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image: How Plants Evolved to Eat Meat

How Plants Evolved to Eat Meat

By | February 7, 2017

Pitcher plants across different continents acquired their tastes for meat in similar ways.

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image: Opinion: Improving FDA Evaluations Without Jeopardizing Safety and Efficacy

Opinion: Improving FDA Evaluations Without Jeopardizing Safety and Efficacy

By | February 1, 2017

What can be done to lower development costs and drug prices?

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image: Infographic: The Cost of Drug Development

Infographic: The Cost of Drug Development

By | February 1, 2017

Expensive clinical trials and few drug approvals can drive up drug prices for consumers.

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image: Pitcher Plant Enzymes Digest Gluten in Mouse Model

Pitcher Plant Enzymes Digest Gluten in Mouse Model

By | February 1, 2017

A newly discovered protease could break down grain proteins that trigger celiac disease.

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image: Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

Earliest Deuterostome Fossils Described

By | January 31, 2017

These millimeter-size sea creatures lived 540 million years ago.

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image: Califf Vacates FDA’s Top Post

Califf Vacates FDA’s Top Post

By | January 20, 2017

Robert Califf steps down as FDA Commissioner as Donald Trump takes office.

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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