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image: A Rainforest Chorus

A Rainforest Chorus

By Karen Zusi | December 1, 2015

Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By Bob Grant | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.


image: Jungle Field Trip

Jungle Field Trip

By The Scientist Staff | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.


image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By Jef Akst | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities


image: BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

By Jef Akst | November 30, 2015

The cancer-related protein BRCA1 is important for learning and memory in mice and is depleted in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, according to a study.


image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By Bob Grant | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.


image: Cortical Census

Cortical Census

By Ruth Williams | November 26, 2015

Scientists document the characteristics and connections of mouse neocortical neurons to establish the most detailed microcircuit map to date.

1 Comment

image: Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

By Kerry Grens | November 24, 2015

Bacteria in the intestine produce proteins that stop rodents from eating.


image: Opinion: Brain Scans in the Courtroom

Opinion: Brain Scans in the Courtroom

By Andreas Kuersten | November 23, 2015

Advances in neuroimaging have improved our understanding of the brain, but the resulting data do little to help judges and juries determine criminal culpability.


image: How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings

How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings

By Ruth Williams | November 19, 2015

A type of bariatric surgery eliminates gut-to-brain signals that trigger sugar highs, a mouse study shows.  

1 Comment

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