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» PCR, cell & molecular biology and microbiology

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image: Toggling Between Life and Death

Toggling Between Life and Death

By Ashley P. Taylor | April 1, 2015

In estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer, the transcription factor IRF1 tips the balance between cellular suicide and survival through autophagy.


image: Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

By Jef Akst | April 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Columbia University. Age: 41


image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By Elena E. Giorgi | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?


image: Resisting Cancer

Resisting Cancer

By George Klein | April 1, 2015

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.


image: Soil Bacteria Live on Wine Grapes

Soil Bacteria Live on Wine Grapes

By Kerry Grens | March 25, 2015

The earthiness of Merlot may have to do with grapevine-dwelling microbiota.


image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By Ruth Williams | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.


image: Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

By Anna Azvolinsky | March 19, 2015

Increasing the abundance of a chemical some microbes use to communicate with one another can help reinstate beneficial bacterial populations in the guts of antibiotic-treated mice. 

1 Comment

image: Irisin Skepticism Goes Way Back

Irisin Skepticism Goes Way Back

By Kerry Grens | March 18, 2015

Post-publication peer reviewers had questioned data about the supposed fat-browning enzyme from the get-go.

1 Comment

image: Sewage Bacteria Linked to Obesity

Sewage Bacteria Linked to Obesity

By Jef Akst | March 10, 2015

Microbes identified in a city’s sewage treatment plants correlate with the population’s obesity rate, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: Nanobombs Terminate Foodborne Microbes

Nanobombs Terminate Foodborne Microbes

By Nsikan Akpan | March 5, 2015

Researchers engineer water nanostructures to wipe out pathogens that can spoil food and pose health risks.


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