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image: Antibiotic Bouncer

Antibiotic Bouncer

By Kerry Grens | March 1, 2013

Contrary to previous assumptions that macrolide antibiotics completely block the exit tunnel of ribosomes, new evidence shows that some peptides are allowed to pass.

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image: Biology Hacklabs

Biology Hacklabs

By Megan Scudellari | March 1, 2013

Fueled by donations, sweat, and occasional dumpster diving, community laboratories for DIY biologists are cropping up around the country.

2 Comments

image: Buying Cell-Culture Products

Buying Cell-Culture Products

By Christi Bird | March 1, 2013

A survey of The Scientist readers reveals who buys cell-growth products from whom, and why.

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image: Crack Control

Crack Control

By Dan Cossins | March 1, 2013

Nanoscale cracks in bone dissipate energy to protect against fracture, a process that appears to be regulated by the interaction of two proteins.

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image: Set It and Forget It

Set It and Forget It

By Carina Storrs | March 1, 2013

A tour of three systems for automating cell culture

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image: Sleep Protection

Sleep Protection

By Kerry Grens | March 1, 2013

Inducing certain brain patterns extends non-REM sleep in mice.

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image: Synthetic Peptide Fools Immune System

Synthetic Peptide Fools Immune System

By Dan Cossins | February 21, 2013

Researchers have created a molecule that helps nanoparticles evade immune attack and could improve drug delivery.  

3 Comments

image: Lucrative Prize for Life Scientists

Lucrative Prize for Life Scientists

By Dan Cossins | February 21, 2013

Three Silicon Valley entrepreneurs are offering $3 million to scientists demonstrating excellence in biology and medical research.

1 Comment

image: Mitochondria Versus Nucleus

Mitochondria Versus Nucleus

By Juliet Ash | February 15, 2013

Disruptions in the interaction between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA can lead to deficiencies in the mitochondrial energy-generating process, affecting fitness.

3 Comments

image: Non-coding Repeats Cause Peptide Clumps

Non-coding Repeats Cause Peptide Clumps

By Ruth Williams | February 7, 2013

Protein aggregates in the brains of some people with dementia or motor neuron disease have a surprising origin.

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