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image: Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

Compound Found in Red Wine Boosts Immune Cell Function

By Catherine Offord | October 17, 2017

At low doses, resveratrol enhanced human T-cell activity in vitro, while at high doses it interfered with cell signaling. 

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A needle-free alternative to the finger-prick test would be a godsend for many sufferers of diabetes, but the industry has yet to clear the technological hurdles.

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Spark Therapeutics’s Luxturna would be the first approved therapy in the U.S. that replaces or repairs a defective gene inherited from one’s parents.


Combined transcription and genome data from multiple tissues in hundreds of human donors reveal links between genotype and gene expression across the body.

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Tissue recipients were treated as “guinea pigs,” says investigation leader.


Mice receiving the treatment produced their own monoclonal antibodies and survived infection with the life-threatening pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.


image: Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

By Catherine Offord | October 2, 2017

The award in Physiology or Medicine goes to chronobiologists Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young.

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image: Bathtub Bloodbath, 1793

Bathtub Bloodbath, 1793

By Shawna Williams | October 1, 2017

French revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat took on many roles over the course of his life, including physician and scientist.


Researchers suggest that the receptors can control early labor contractions.


image: Contributors


By Aggie Mika | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.


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