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image: Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

By , , and | November 1, 2017

Advances in single-cell technologies have revealed vast differences between cells once thought to be in the same category, calling into question how we define cell type in the first place.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Infographic: Understanding Our Diverse Brain

Infographic: Understanding Our Diverse Brain

By , , and | November 1, 2017

Recent advances in single-cell omics and other techniques are revealing variation at genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, and posttranscriptomic levels.

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image: Lessons in Memory from a Champ

Lessons in Memory from a Champ

By | November 1, 2017

A four-time winner of the USA Memory Championship is helping scientists understand how the brain works.

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image: These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

By | November 1, 2017

The phenomenon is one of the few examples of eavesdropping across the vertebrate/invertebrate barrier.

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image: These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

By | November 1, 2017

Insects feast on amorous tungara frogs by eavesdropping on their amphibian love songs.

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image: Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

By | November 1, 2017

These insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.

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image: Advancing Techniques Reveal the Brain’s Impressive Diversity

Advancing Techniques Reveal the Brain’s Impressive Diversity

By , , and | November 1, 2017

No two neurons are alike. What does that mean for brain function?

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With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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image: RNA Editing Possible with CRISPR-Cas13

RNA Editing Possible with CRISPR-Cas13

By | October 25, 2017

Scientists extend the capabilities of the CRISPR-Cas system to include precise manipulations of RNA sequences in human cells.

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