The Scientist

» entomology

Most Recent

image: Image of the Day: Ant Attack!

Image of the Day: Ant Attack!

By The Scientist Staff | April 24, 2018

A new species of ant discovered in Borneo fends off invaders with a uniquely suicidal strategy.

1 Comment

Quentin Wheeler’s firing of department chairs earlier this year didn’t sit well with university faculty members.  

0 Comments

image: Love in the Scientific Literature

Love in the Scientific Literature

By Cassandra Willyard | February 12, 2018

There are countless ways for scientists to say, “I love you.” Naming a slime-mold beetle after your wife (and another after your ex-wife) is, apparently, one of them.  

2 Comments

Over the past seven years, Xiao-Long Lin has characterized nearly 70 new species of nonbiting midges and developed DNA barcodes to aid in future ecological surveys.

0 Comments

image: War Dance of the Honeybee

War Dance of the Honeybee

By Karl Gruber | February 1, 2018

One species has developed a novel waggle to warn about invading wasps.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Ancient Moth Wings

Image of the Day: Ancient Moth Wings

By The Scientist Staff | January 12, 2018

The 200-million-year-old fossils, the earliest found of lepidopterans, show characteristics of extant moths.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Moth Resurrection

Image of the Day: Moth Resurrection

By The Scientist Staff | December 18, 2017

Entomologists have rediscovered a species of moth that was considered lost for 130 years. 

0 Comments

image: Bees Live the City Life in Detroit

Bees Live the City Life in Detroit

By Catherine Offord | September 1, 2017

Important pollinators under threat from habitat destruction, bumblebees may find refuge on vacant land throughout Michigan’s largest metropolis.

2 Comments

image: Uncovering the Secrets of a Successful Pest

Uncovering the Secrets of a Successful Pest

By Diana Kwon | May 1, 2017

The green peach aphid can colonize new host plants with ease through rapid changes in gene expression.

2 Comments

image: Sweet Trick, Hawkmoths

Sweet Trick, Hawkmoths

By Bob Grant | April 17, 2017

The fast-flying insects convert sugars from nectar into antioxidants, which can help heal the oxidative damage suffered by their hard-working muscles.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How to Separate the Science From the (Jerk) Scientist
  2. Could a Dose of Sunshine Make You Smarter?
  3. Sweden Cancels Agreement With Elsevier Over Open Access
  4. Researchers Develop a Drug Against the Common Cold