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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: DIYbio: Low Risk, High Potential

DIYbio: Low Risk, High Potential

By | March 1, 2013

Citizen scientists can inspire innovation and advance science education—and they are proving adept at self-policing.

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image: Regulating Amateurs

Regulating Amateurs

By | March 1, 2013

How should the government ensure the safety and responsibility of do-it-yourself biologists?

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image: The Rebirth of DIYbio

The Rebirth of DIYbio

By | March 1, 2013

Do-it-yourself science is likely as old as science itself, driven by an inherent curiosity about the world around us.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: Regulating Dangerous Research

Regulating Dangerous Research

By | February 23, 2013

The US government has come out with new rules for life science research deemed risky.

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image: Opinion: From Polymerase to Politics

Opinion: From Polymerase to Politics

By | February 11, 2013

Why so few scientists make the leap to policy-making positions, and why more should give it a try

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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