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Low levels of a biochemical process involved in fat breakdown predicts weight gain and metabolic complications more than a decade later.

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image: Big Data in 3 Dimensions

Big Data in 3 Dimensions

By Jim Daley | May 1, 2018

Viewing oncogenic mutations in 3-D showed that they cluster together on folded proteins.

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Findings from a randomized, controlled trial finds that reducing food intake decreases metabolism and reduces oxidative damage to tissues and cells.

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image: How Gaining and Losing Weight Affects the Body

How Gaining and Losing Weight Affects the Body

By Abby Olena | January 17, 2018

Millions of measurements from 23 people who consumed extra calories every day for a month reveal changes in proteins, metabolites, and gut microbiota that accompany shifts in body mass.

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image: High-Throughput Epigenetics Analyses

High-Throughput Epigenetics Analyses

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | January 1, 2018

Emerging technologies help researchers draw mechanistic links between metabolism and epigenetic modification of DNA.

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Maintaining dynamic connections among the body’s mitochondria is required for the health and life-extending benefits of low-calorie diets for nematodes.

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image: Hormone Loss Prevents Obesity and Diabetes in Mice

Hormone Loss Prevents Obesity and Diabetes in Mice

By Abby Olena | November 6, 2017

Asprosin—involved in a rare disease called neonatal progeroid syndrome—targets neurons to stimulate appetite, and blocking the hormone wards off weight gain in rodents.

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image: Olfaction Determines Weight in Mice

Olfaction Determines Weight in Mice

By Diana Kwon | July 5, 2017

Animals lacking a sense of smell stayed thinner than their smelling counterparts, despite eating the same amount.

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image: Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

By Ashley Yeager | June 6, 2017

Data point to peaks in gene expression in the morning and evening that are distinct from day-night circadian cycles.

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image: Running on Empty

Running on Empty

By Bob Grant | June 1, 2017

Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

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