The Scientist

» metabolism

Most Recent

image: Cancer Diet Shared by Healthy Cells

Cancer Diet Shared by Healthy Cells

By | January 23, 2013

Tumor cells rapidly divide by usurping a metabolic trick from normal cell development.

4 Comments

image: Insulin's Role in Body and Brain

Insulin's Role in Body and Brain

By , , and | December 6, 2012

Insulin, long recognized as a primary regulator of blood glucose, is now also understood to play key roles in neuroplasticity, neuromodulation, and neurotrophism.

0 Comments

image: Fat's Immune Sentinels

Fat's Immune Sentinels

By | December 1, 2012

Certain immune cells keep adipose tissue in check by helping to define normal and abnormal physiological states.

0 Comments

image: In the Long Run

In the Long Run

By | December 1, 2012

Can emulating our early human ancestors make us healthier?

1 Comment

image: Stress Tests

Stress Tests

By | September 1, 2012

Judiciously applied pressure could benefit the scientific system by providing an opportunity for renewal.

4 Comments

image: Live Slow, Die Old

Live Slow, Die Old

By | May 17, 2012

Ancient bacteria living in deep-sea sediments are alive—but with metabolisms so slow that it’s hard to tell.

13 Comments

image: Treating Fat with Fat

Treating Fat with Fat

By | May 1, 2012

Is brown fat ready for therapeutic prime time?

22 Comments

image: Biota Babble

Biota Babble

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

2 Comments

image: A Mammalian Longevity Gene?

A Mammalian Longevity Gene?

By | February 23, 2012

Researchers find the first evidence that a sirtuin gene prolongs life in mice.

4 Comments

image: Immune Heat

Immune Heat

By | February 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  2. Two Dozen House Republicans Do an About-Face on Tuition Tax
  3. Putative Gay Genes Identified, Questioned
    The Nutshell Putative Gay Genes Identified, Questioned

    A genomic interrogation of homosexuality turns up speculative links between genetic elements and sexual orientation, but researchers say the study is too small to be significant. 

  4. Can Young Stem Cells Make Older People Stronger?
FreeShip