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Social insects kill infected individuals for the benefit of the colony—and now a study has shown how they know who’s sick.

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A controversial hypothesis suggests that jellyfish may one day rule the oceans, and Mola mola may tell us if we are approaching a tipping point.

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image: Bees’ Molecular Responses to Neonicotinoids Determined

Bees’ Molecular Responses to Neonicotinoids Determined

By Catherine Offord | March 22, 2018

Researchers pinpoint a protein that can metabolize at least one of the insecticides, highlighting a route to identifying compounds that are friendlier to the critical pollinators.

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image: Image of the Day: Flock of Algae

Image of the Day: Flock of Algae

By The Scientist Staff | March 21, 2018

Volvox barberi actively organize themselves into large colonies that optimize space.

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image: Many Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect Gut Bacteria

Many Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect Gut Bacteria

By Catherine Offord | March 20, 2018

A new study finds that more than 200 human-targeted, non-antibiotic drugs inhibit the growth of bacterial species that make up part of the human microbiome.

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image: Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

By Ruth Williams | March 15, 2018

A device dubbed the “mother machine” enables real-time observation of mutagenesis in single bacterial cells.  

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In an unusual evolutionary twist, local stick spiders have come up with an almost identical repertoire of color morphs in multiple locations.

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image: Image of the Day: Living Color

Image of the Day: Living Color

By The Scientist Staff | March 8, 2018

Biodegradable pigments could be custom-grown by bacteria in the future, say researchers.  

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image: Slime Mold in Residence

Slime Mold in Residence

By Ashley P. Taylor | March 2, 2018

At Hampshire College, students and faculty use the amoeba Physarum polycephalum—both a “visiting scholar” and a model organism—to examine human societal and political quandaries.  

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A molecule produced by a strain of Staphylococcus epidermis interferes with DNA synthesis.

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