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image: Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure

By Jef Akst | March 1, 2014

Researchers are using snowdrifts to artificially warm Arctic tundra during winter and finding that more carbon is released from the soil than plants can soak up from the atmosphere.

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image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By Tracy Vence | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus

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image: Wither Social Media?

Wither Social Media?

By Tracy Vence | January 22, 2014

Researchers apply epidemiological approaches to model user adoption and abandonment of sites like Facebook.

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image: New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

By Jef Akst | January 21, 2014

A virus that causes blight in plants may contribute the catastrophic decline of honeybee colonies.

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image: Older Trees Grow Faster

Older Trees Grow Faster

By Bob Grant | January 20, 2014

Mature trees soak up more CO2 than younger ones, a study shows, overturning a bit of botanical dogma.

3 Comments

image: Fewer Female Snail Penises

Fewer Female Snail Penises

By Tracy Vence | January 14, 2014

Researchers are now spotting fewer cases of imposex—in which female sea snails develop male sexual organs—as a result of a chemical ban instituted in 2008.

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image: Large Carnivores Under Siege

Large Carnivores Under Siege

By Bob Grant | January 13, 2014

As populations of top predators decline in ecosystems the world over, researchers chart the widespread effects.

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image: Settlement Signal

Settlement Signal

By Abby Olena | January 9, 2014

A marine bacterium generates contractile structures that are essential for the metamorphosis of a tubeworm.

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image: Unhealthy Chemicals Linked to Fracking

Unhealthy Chemicals Linked to Fracking

By Jef Akst | December 17, 2013

Water samples collected from natural gas extraction sites in Colorado contain hormone-disrupting chemicals linked to birth defects, infertility, and cancer.

1 Comment

image: Tweet Talk

Tweet Talk

By Tracy Vence | December 11, 2013

A new analysis finds is no link between a researcher’s citations and Twitter mentions of her scientific research.

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