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image: Did <em>Spinosaurus </em> Swim?

Did Spinosaurus Swim?

By | September 15, 2014

Most complete skeleton suggests the dinosaurs were semi-aquatic hunters. 

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image: Small Molecule Superstore

Small Molecule Superstore

By | September 15, 2014

An analysis of bacterial sequences from the Human Microbiome Project has uncovered thousands of biosynthetic gene clusters.

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image: Prehistoric Critters Change View of Mammal Evolution

Prehistoric Critters Change View of Mammal Evolution

By | September 12, 2014

Three extinct squirrel-like species were identified from Jurassic-era fossils in China.

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | September 10, 2014

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | September 5, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Humongous Herbivorous Dinosaur

Humongous Herbivorous Dinosaur

By | September 4, 2014

A near-complete titanosaur fossil provides new details of the dinosaurs’ lives. 

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image: Losing Languages

Losing Languages

By | September 4, 2014

Biological criteria and evolutionary models help predict threats to spoken language, according to two studies.

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The ALS Association has raised more than $100 million in donations through a charity campaign that went viral. How should that money be spent?

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image: A Long Line of LINEs

A Long Line of LINEs

By | September 1, 2014

Different mechanisms repress mobile DNA elements in human embryonic stem cells depending on the elements’ evolutionary ages.

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