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image: Researchers Create Hair-Growing Skin Organoids

Researchers Create Hair-Growing Skin Organoids

By | January 3, 2018

The mini-organs reproduce the two cell layers present in mouse skin and the development of hair follicles, providing a potential model for skin and hair research.

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image: Child Receives Transgenic Skin

Child Receives Transgenic Skin

By | January 1, 2018

A combination gene-and-cell therapy has given a boy with a grievous skin disease a new lease on life, and resolved a dermatology debate to boot.

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image: Glial Ties to Persistent Pain

Glial Ties to Persistent Pain

By | January 1, 2018

Immune-like cells in the central nervous system are now recognized as key participants in the creation and maintenance of persistent pain.

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image: Infographic: A Painful Pathway

Infographic: A Painful Pathway

By | January 1, 2018

Since the mid-2000s, the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 has emerged as a promising target for a new class of analgesics.

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image: Infographic: Two Pain Paths Diverge in the Body

Infographic: Two Pain Paths Diverge in the Body

By | January 1, 2018

The acute pain that results from injury or disease is very different from chronic pain.

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After an initial wounding, genes needed for repair remain ready for action.

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image: Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief

Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief

By | January 1, 2018

The race to develop analgesic drugs that inhibit sodium channel NaV1.7 is revealing a complex sensory role for the protein.

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Researchers uncover a family of compounds that may be involved in pain transmission.

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image: Image of the Day: Actin Burst

Image of the Day: Actin Burst

By | December 6, 2017

Researchers are looking at actin polymerization and calcium uptake in human cells to study mitochondrial division.

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image: Captivated by Chromosomes

Captivated by Chromosomes

By | December 1, 2017

Peering through a microscope since age 14, Joseph Gall, now 89, still sees wonder at the other end.

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