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image: Bacteria-Treated Mosquitoes Released in More Locations

Bacteria-Treated Mosquitoes Released in More Locations

By | January 17, 2017

Infected with Wolbachia, the insects are expected to reduce the spread of dengue and Zika. But scientists say the approach may have limitations.

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Children born to obese parents are at increased risk of failing motor development and cognitive tests, according to an NIH-led study.

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image: Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

By | December 2, 2016

Andrzej Tarkowski’s research laid the groundwork for future advances in cloning, stem cell research, and in vitro fertilization.

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image: How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

By | December 1, 2016

Sequencing and gene-editing advances make tracing a cells journey throughout development easier than ever.

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image: Autism Not Linked to Flu or Flu Shot During Pregnancy

Autism Not Linked to Flu or Flu Shot During Pregnancy

By | November 29, 2016

A study of nearly 200,000 children finds no increased risk for autism among kids whose moms caught the flu or received a flu vaccine while pregnant.

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State health officials say a woman has been infected with the virus, possibly as a result of a locally acquired mosquito bite.

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image: Zika-Associated Microcephaly Can Present After Birth

Zika-Associated Microcephaly Can Present After Birth

By | November 23, 2016

Researchers report on more than a dozen cases in which babies who showed signs of in-utero infection but were born without symptoms of congenital Zika syndrome went on to develop brain abnormalities. 

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image: Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

By | November 1, 2016

How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon

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image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

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Based on epidemiological data, researchers estimate that reducing exposures to certain environmental chemicals could drop people’s chances of developing the disease.

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