The Scientist

» anatomy and immunology

Most Recent

image: A Prosthetic Advantage?

A Prosthetic Advantage?

By | September 1, 2017

Scientists are analyzing how factors such as the length and stiffness of artificial limbs affect performance in athletes with amputations.

1 Comment

image: How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

By | September 1, 2017

A study traces proteins’ evolution from the immune to the olfactory system.

0 Comments

image: Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?

Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?

By | September 1, 2017

The once fringe idea is gaining traction among the scientific community.

6 Comments

Emerging evidence links bacterial or viral infection with the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease.

0 Comments

image: Dengue Infection Impairs Immune Defense Against Zika

Dengue Infection Impairs Immune Defense Against Zika

By | August 18, 2017

A memory B cell response to Zika virus in dengue-infected patients produced antibodies that were poorly neutralizing in vitro and instead enhanced infection.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Un-break My Heart

Image of the Day: Un-break My Heart

By | August 8, 2017

A failing heart is easily distinguished from a healthy one by numerous tell-tale signs, including its slender, stretched-out walls, increased size, and pooled blood clots.

0 Comments

image: The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

By | August 7, 2017

Researchers continue to identify new T-cell subtypes—and devise ways to use them to fight cancer. The Scientist attempts to catalog them all.

2 Comments

image: Heart’s Backup Pacemaker Mechanisms Identified

Heart’s Backup Pacemaker Mechanisms Identified

By | July 28, 2017

The sinoatrial node is home to multiple pacemakers that keep the heart beating if the main one falters.

0 Comments

Another case of HIV remission emerges, this time in a South African girl diagnosed as an infant and disease-free for more than eight years.

0 Comments

image: Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

By | July 21, 2017

A new study adds to the evidence that mammalian cells can use small interfering RNAs to defend against viruses, but questions remain about physiological importance.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Man Receives First In Vivo Gene-Editing Therapy
  2. Researchers Build a Cancer Immunotherapy Without Immune Cells
  3. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

  4. Long-term Study Finds That the Pesticide Glyphosate Does Not Cause Cancer
RayBiotech