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Transmission of stress signals in E. coli is dependent on the distance between its inner and outer membranes.

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image: Nobel Prize–Winning Biologist Dies

Nobel Prize–Winning Biologist Dies

By Catherine Offord | February 20, 2018

Günter Blobel, known for his work on the signal hypothesis of protein targeting, has died from cancer at age 81.

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image: Plant Cell Walls Can Control Growth in the Dark

Plant Cell Walls Can Control Growth in the Dark

By Kerry Grens | February 1, 2018

To maintain an energy-saving growth strategy in the absence of light, seedlings need signals generated by pectin in their cell walls.

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image: Damage Patroller

Damage Patroller

By Anna Azvolinsky | October 1, 2017

Stephen Elledge has built a career studying how eukaryotic cells maintain genomic integrity.

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image: How Exercise Might Fight Cancer

How Exercise Might Fight Cancer

By Jef Akst | September 8, 2017

Epinephrine’s activation of the signaling pathway Hippo is responsible for the in vitro tumor-fighting effects of serum from women who worked out.

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image: Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

By Megan Scudellari | July 17, 2017

And the same endocannabinoid system that translates marijuana's buzz-inducing compounds into a high plays crucial roles in health and disease outside the brain.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By Ben Andrew Henry | February 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By Anna Azvolinsky | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

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image: RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

RNA Interference Between Kingdoms

By Kerry Grens | February 1, 2017

Plants and fungi can use conserved RNA interference machinery to regulate each other’s gene expression—and scientists think they can make use of this phenomenon to create a new generation of pesticides.

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