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image: Adapting to Elevated CO<sub>2</sub>

Adapting to Elevated CO2

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | September 1, 2015

High carbon dioxide levels can irreversibly rev up a cyanobacterium’s ability to fix nitrogen over the long term, a study finds.


image: The Great Big Clean-Up

The Great Big Clean-Up

By Kerry Grens | September 1, 2015

From tossing out cross-contaminated cell lines to flagging genomic misnomers, a push is on to tidy up biomedical research.


image: Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

Microorganisms Make a House a Home?

By Amanda B. Keener | August 26, 2015

The fungal and bacterial communities in household dust can reveal some details about a building’s inhabitants.


image: Bacteria to Blame?

Bacteria to Blame?

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | August 18, 2015

T cells activated in the microbe-dense gut can spark an autoimmune eye disease, a study shows. 


image: The Search for Persisters

The Search for Persisters

By Amanda B. Keener | August 11, 2015

Lyme disease–causing bacteria can outmaneuver antibiotics in vitro and manipulate the mouse immune system.


image: Bacterial Enzyme an Antismoking Aid?

Bacterial Enzyme an Antismoking Aid?

By Jef Akst | August 10, 2015

A compound that degrades nicotine before it reaches the brain could serve as a successful smoking cessation therapy, according to an in vitro study.


image: Subway Microbiome Study Revised

Subway Microbiome Study Revised

By Amanda B. Keener | August 4, 2015

Researchers tone down their highly publicized study that reported the presence of deadly pathogens on New York City subways.


image: TB Traces

TB Traces

By The Scientist Staff | August 1, 2015

Take a trip to the mummy museum in Vác, Hungary, to see the human remains that helped researchers learn more about the origins of tuberculosis in Europe.


image: Anthrax Sent in Error to 86 Labs

Anthrax Sent in Error to 86 Labs

By Kerry Grens | July 29, 2015

A US Army lab shipped live spores of the deadly bacterium because of improper irradiation protocols, a Department of Defense review has found.

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image: Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness

Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness

By Anna Azvolinsky | July 22, 2015

In some pathogenic bacteria, certain antibiotic resistance–associated mutations may also confer an unexpected growth advantage.


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