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image: The Gravity of Life

The Gravity of Life

By | June 1, 2011

Whose well-being is threatened by our changing relationship with the myriad organisms that shaped the evolution of our species?

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image: Shooting Down Addiction

Shooting Down Addiction

By | June 1, 2011

A new breed of vaccines aims to wean users off cocaine.

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image: A Shot in the Arm

A Shot in the Arm

By | June 1, 2011

Decades of vaccine research have expanded our understanding of the immune system and are yielding novel disease-fighting tactics.

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image: 2010's best new species

2010's best new species

By | May 26, 2011

This Monday (May 23), which happens to be the birthday of famed naturalist and species namer extraordinaire Carolus Linnaeus, researchers at Arizona State University listed their picks of the top 10 newly-described species of 2010. 

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image: Control from Without

Control from Without

By | May 25, 2011

Editor's Choice in Developmental Biology

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image: Primal Fashion

Primal Fashion

By | May 20, 2011

Two sisters -- a developmental biologist and high-end fashion designer -- team up to develop a couture collection inspired by the first 1,000 hours of embryonic life.

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image: Lessons from the marine census

Lessons from the marine census

By | May 19, 2011

Now that the ten-year effort to take stock of the diversity of life in the oceans came to a triumphant end late last year, researchers involved in the Census for Marine Life are reflecting on the project's shortcomings.

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image: Early freshwater life

Early freshwater life

By | May 19, 2011

Tiny fossil tracks embedded in a California rock formation that was once part of an ancient river may be evidence that freshwater ecosystems arose around 100 million years earlier than what is generally believed.

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Skeleton Keys

By | May 14, 2011

There are a surprising number of unknowns about how our limbs come to be symmetrical.

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image: Micro Farmers

Micro Farmers

By | May 1, 2011

Columbia University evolutionary ecologist Dustin Rubenstein explains just why it's so interesting and important to find slime molds that engage in a form of agriculture.

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