The Scientist

» public outreach and developmental biology

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Chat With Charlie

Chat With Charlie

By | February 1, 2016

See a preview of the app that lets you ask questions of a virtual Charles Darwin.

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image: Getting the Word Out

Getting the Word Out

By | February 1, 2016

In a shifting media landscape with a growing public interest in science, some researchers are doing their own PR.

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image: Scientific Literacy Redefined

Scientific Literacy Redefined

By | February 1, 2016

Researchers could become better at engaging in public discourse by more fully considering the social and cultural contexts of their work.

9 Comments

image: The Scientific Outreach Gap

The Scientific Outreach Gap

By | December 7, 2015

A survey finds that arts, humanities, and social science faculty members in the U.K. engage more with the general public than their counterparts in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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