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image: The Root of the Problem

The Root of the Problem

By | August 1, 2011

New research suggests that the flow of carbon through plants to underground ecosystems may be crucial to how the environment responds to climate change.

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image: Memory Aid

Memory Aid

By | August 1, 2011

Editor's Choice in Neuroscience

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image: Seeing the Forest for the Trees

Seeing the Forest for the Trees

By | August 1, 2011

Getting the big picture means asking lots of little questions.

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image: An Unlichenly Pair

An Unlichenly Pair

By | August 1, 2011

A young botanist pays tribute to his mentor by naming a newly discovered, rare species in his honor.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2011

First Life, Radioactivity, Brain Bugs, Life of Earth

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Contributors

August 1, 2011

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2011 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Sharing the Bounty

Sharing the Bounty

By | August 1, 2011

Gut bacteria may be the missing piece that explains the connection between diet and cancer risk.

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Fisheries scientist ordered to refuse interviews about research on salmon decline.

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image: Chimp Brains Don’t Shrink with Age

Chimp Brains Don’t Shrink with Age

By | July 25, 2011

Unlike human brains, chimpanzee brains don’t get smaller as they age, suggesting that pronounced neurological decline is a uniquely human byproduct of our oversized brains and extreme longevity.

33 Comments

image: Regulating the Humanized

Regulating the Humanized

By | July 25, 2011

A UK panel puts forth guidelines for research that use experimental animals harboring human cells and tissues.

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