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image: Image of the Day: Glowing Tide

Image of the Day: Glowing Tide

By The Scientist Staff | May 10, 2018

Each year, bioluminescent microorganisms create striking displays on the beaches of San Diego.

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Sequencing of a single gene can spot patients with a dangerous form of mycosis fungoides better than other prognostic tests.  

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image: Ancient Humans Had Hepatitis B

Ancient Humans Had Hepatitis B

By Abby Olena | May 9, 2018

Analyses of more than 300 ancient human genomes show that Hepatitis B virus has infected humans for at least 4,500 years and has much older origins than modern viral genomes would suggest.

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The microbiologist was known for his work on bacterial antibiotic resistance and infectious disease.

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image: Image of the Day: Hold My Brood

Image of the Day: Hold My Brood

By The Scientist Staff | May 9, 2018

Cuckoo catfish trick cichlids into caring for their eggs in a strategy known as brood parasitism.

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image: Image of the Day: Bacterial Flagella

Image of the Day: Bacterial Flagella

By The Scientist Staff | May 8, 2018

Real-time imaging reveals the formation of the bacterial flagella FlhA ring.

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image: Opinion: How We Found a New Way to Detect “Hidden Sharks”

Opinion: How We Found a New Way to Detect “Hidden Sharks”

By Stefano Mariani and Judith Bakker | May 7, 2018

Given the speed and efficiency of environmental (eDNA) sampling, a much larger portion of the sea can be screened, in a shorter time, for patterns of diversity.

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image: Image of the Day: The Five Percent

Image of the Day: The Five Percent

By The Scientist Staff | May 7, 2018

A map of neural networks in the striatum of the mouse brain reveals clues about psychiatric and movement disorders.

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image: Image of the Day: Bird Braincase

Image of the Day: Bird Braincase

By The Scientist Staff | May 4, 2018

Newly discovered fossils shed light on the structure of the feeding apparatus of ancient seabirds.

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A study finds two species of guenon monkeys in Tanzania have been mating and producing fertile offspring for generations.

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