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image: Epigenetics—A Primer

Epigenetics—A Primer

By | March 1, 2011

Epigenetic events regulate the activities of genes without changing the DNA sequence. Different genes are expressed depending on the methyl-marks attached to DNA itself and by changes in the structure and/or composition of chromatin. 

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image: Top 7 From F1000

Top 7 From F1000

By | March 1, 2011

A snapshot of the highest-ranked articles from a 30-day period on Faculty of 1000

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image: Opening a Can of Worms

Opening a Can of Worms

By | February 1, 2011

A father’s determination to help his son resulted in an experimental treatment for autism that uses roundworms to modulate inflammatory immune responses. Can the worms be used to treat other diseases?

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image: The Worm Crew

The Worm Crew

By | February 1, 2011

Meet the people behind studies that use nematodes to treat inflammatory diseases. 

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image: Parasites Unite!

Parasites Unite!

By | February 1, 2011

Gabriele Sorci discusses how invaders can band together to more effectively infect hosts.

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image: Losers Fight Back

Losers Fight Back

By | February 1, 2011

Editor's choice in developmental biology

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2011

February 2011's selection of notable quotes

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image: Appealing Choice

Appealing Choice

By | January 1, 2011

A book is born from pondering why sexual selection was, for so long, a minor component of evolutionary biology.

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image: Eau de Choice

Eau de Choice

By | January 1, 2011

Evolutionary biologist Jane Hurst at the University of Liverpool has found that male mice have evolved a cunning trick to distinguish themselves within the dating pool: they produce a specific protein that drives female attraction to male scent, and this molecule, called darcin, helps females remember a specific male's odor.

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image: Mining Bacterial Small Molecules

Mining Bacterial Small Molecules

By | January 1, 2011

As much as rainforests or deep-sea vents, the human gut holds rich stores of microbial chemicals that should be mined for their pharmacological potential.

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