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image: Neurotransmitter-Regulated Immunity

Neurotransmitter-Regulated Immunity

By | September 15, 2011

Nerve signals control T cell responses, helping to explain inflammation and stroke.

7 Comments

image: Top 7 in Aging Research

Top 7 in Aging Research

By | September 13, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in aging research and related areas, from Faculty of 1000

3 Comments

image: Secrets of Aging

Secrets of Aging

By | September 1, 2011

What does a normally aging brain look like? Are diseases of aging such as Alzheimer’s inevitable?

78 Comments

image: Seeing Through Mice

Seeing Through Mice

By | September 1, 2011

A new technique for turning mouse fetuses transparent offers a literal window into the brain.

0 Comments

image: <em>Art + Science Now</em>

Art + Science Now

By | September 1, 2011

The book that serves as bio art's encyclopedia.

6 Comments

image: Lost in Space

Lost in Space

By | September 1, 2011

Looking for a more realistic way to study memory, we turned to place cells­­—­a network of cells that record a rat’s memory of an environment. 

0 Comments

image: Molecular Learning

Molecular Learning

By | September 1, 2011

Long-term potentiation (LTP), discovered in the 1970s, was later shown to be the molecular basis of memory. 

0 Comments

image: Octophilosophy

Octophilosophy

By | September 1, 2011

When it comes to studying cephalopod brains and behavior, it helps to have a philosopher around.

30 Comments

image: The Seat of Memory

The Seat of Memory

By | September 1, 2011

Early on, researchers had learned that the hippocampus was the structure in the brain where long-term memories were created and stored, but it was not known whether the different cell types within this structure might be more or less susceptible to the aging process.

0 Comments

image: To Pee or Not to Pee

To Pee or Not to Pee

By | September 1, 2011

Have researchers found the seat of urination control in a primitive brain region?

1 Comment

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