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image: The Sleeping Brain Can Learn

The Sleeping Brain Can Learn

By Diana Kwon | August 8, 2017

Humans can remember new sensory information presented during REM sleep, but this ability is suppressed during deep, slow-wave slumber.

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image: The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

By Ashley P. Taylor | August 7, 2017

Researchers continue to identify new T-cell subtypes—and devise ways to use them to fight cancer. The Scientist attempts to catalog them all.

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image: Study: Eating Less Helps Worms Learn

Study: Eating Less Helps Worms Learn

By Aggie Mika | August 2, 2017

Food restriction decreases a metabolite that impedes associative learning in worms. 

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Another case of HIV remission emerges, this time in a South African girl diagnosed as an infant and disease-free for more than eight years.

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image: Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

By Shawna Williams | July 21, 2017

A new study adds to the evidence that mammalian cells can use small interfering RNAs to defend against viruses, but questions remain about physiological importance.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By Emily Monosson | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By Emily Monosson | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: The Evolutionary Roots of Instinct

The Evolutionary Roots of Instinct

By Becca Cudmore | July 17, 2017

Did behaviors that seem ingrained become fixed through epigenetic mechanisms and ancestral learning?

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By Ashley Yeager | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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