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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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image: DNA Origami

DNA Origami

By | July 17, 2017

Will complex, folded synthetic DNA molecules one day serve as capsules to deliver drugs to cancer cells?

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At Harvard University the chemical biologist looks for new metabolic pathways to investigate how gut bacteria interact with one another and their hosts.

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image: Microbe Maven

Microbe Maven

By | July 17, 2017

Meet Scientist to Watch Emily Balskus, who studies the microbes that inhabit humans.

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image: Microbiota Manipulations

Microbiota Manipulations

By | July 17, 2017

Two research teams develop tools for tinkering with a bacterial genus prominent in human guts.

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image: The Evolutionary Roots of Instinct

The Evolutionary Roots of Instinct

By | July 17, 2017

Did behaviors that seem ingrained become fixed through epigenetic mechanisms and ancestral learning?

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image: Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

By | July 17, 2017

And the same endocannabinoid system that translates marijuana's buzz-inducing compounds into a high plays crucial roles in health and disease outside the brain.

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image: Endocannabinoids in the Groove

Endocannabinoids in the Groove

By | July 17, 2017

The system responsible for the buzz humans get from marijuana plays a passel of physiological roles outside the brain.

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image: Messing with the Microbiome

Messing with the Microbiome

By | July 17, 2017

Two new techniques allow researchers to manipulate the activity of gut bacteria. 

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image: Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

By | July 14, 2017

Researchers develop a method that combines the strengths of shotgun metagenomics and single-cell genome sequencing in a microfluidics-based platform.

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