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image: Biologists Will Be Listening to the Eclipse

Biologists Will Be Listening to the Eclipse

By | August 18, 2017

At 100 sites around North America, field recorders are set to record natures’ response to the blotting out of the sun on Monday.

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image: A Grisly Stork Buffet

A Grisly Stork Buffet

By | August 15, 2017

Marabou storks on Kenya’s Mara River feast on the carcasses of migrating wildebeest that failed to make it across the waterway.

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image: From Mass Death, Life

From Mass Death, Life

By | August 15, 2017

When thousands of animals die during mass migrations, ecosystems accommodate the corpses and new cycles are set in motion.

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image: Image of the Day: Everybody Needs a Friend

Image of the Day: Everybody Needs a Friend

By | August 10, 2017

The protein encoded by the gene that causes Fragile X in humans partners with another protein, dNab2, to alter gene expression in fruit fly neurons.

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image: The Sleeping Brain Can Learn

The Sleeping Brain Can Learn

By | August 8, 2017

Humans can remember new sensory information presented during REM sleep, but this ability is suppressed during deep, slow-wave slumber.

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image: Ecotourism: Biological Benefit or Bane?

Ecotourism: Biological Benefit or Bane?

By , , , and | August 4, 2017

As nature-based tourism becomes more popular, considering the ecological effects of the practice becomes paramount.

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image: Great Lakes Gray Wolf to Retain Endangered Status

Great Lakes Gray Wolf to Retain Endangered Status

By | August 2, 2017

A US Court of Appeals ruled that the Interior Department acted prematurely in removing the animals from the endangered species list.

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image: Study: Eating Less Helps Worms Learn

Study: Eating Less Helps Worms Learn

By | August 2, 2017

Food restriction decreases a metabolite that impedes associative learning in worms. 

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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