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Contributors

By Abby Olena and Tracy Vence | January 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: New Species Abound

New Species Abound

By Jef Akst | December 26, 2013

A look at 2013’s noteworthy new species

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image: Top Genomes of 2013

Top Genomes of 2013

By Abby Olena | December 26, 2013

What researchers learned as they dug through the most highly cited genomes published this year

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image: On The Origin of Flowers

On The Origin of Flowers

By Ed Yong | December 19, 2013

The genome of Amborella trichopoda—the sister species of all flowering plants—provides clues about this group’s rise to power.

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image: The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

By Ruth Williams | December 18, 2013

A newly sequenced Neanderthal genome provides insight into the sex lives of human ancestors.

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Herding Cats

By Abby Olena | December 17, 2013

Examination of bones found in a Chinese village suggests that domesticated felines lived side-by-side with humans 5,300 years ago.

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image: Test Scores Are in the Genes

Test Scores Are in the Genes

By Jef Akst | December 16, 2013

More than school or family environment, a child’s genetics influences high school exam results.

7 Comments

image: How Bacteria Evade the Immune System

How Bacteria Evade the Immune System

By Laasya Samhita | December 12, 2013

Escherichia coli can quickly evolve to resist engulfment by macrophages, scientists have found.

4 Comments

image: A New Basal Animal

A New Basal Animal

By Ruth Williams | December 12, 2013

Comb jellies take their place on the oldest branch of the animal family tree.  

4 Comments

image: Gender-based Citation Disparities

Gender-based Citation Disparities

By Abby Olena | December 12, 2013

An analysis reveals that papers with women as key authors are cited less often than those with men as key authors.

2 Comments

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