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image: Image of the Day: Older and Wiser

Image of the Day: Older and Wiser

By Sukanya Charuchandra | June 8, 2018

As the years go by, seabirds such as gannets get better at foraging.  

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image: What Made Human Brains So Big?

What Made Human Brains So Big?

By Ashley Yeager | May 24, 2018

Ecological challenges such as finding food and creating fire may have led the organ to become abnormally large, a new computer model suggests.

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image: Could a Dose of Sunshine Make You Smarter?

Could a Dose of Sunshine Make You Smarter?

By Ruth Williams | May 17, 2018

Moderate ultraviolet light exposure boosts the brainpower of mice thanks to increased production of the neurotransmitter glutamate.  

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Changes in gene activity levels after DBS appear to underlie improvements seen in a mouse model of Rett syndrome, a genetic disease that causes intellectual disability.

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Researchers identified thousands of immature neurons in the brain region, countering a recent result showing little, if any, signs of neurogenesis.

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Failure to produce evidence of neural precursor cells and immature neurons raises questions about the role of the process in learning and memory.

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image: Learning Opens the Genome

Learning Opens the Genome

By Ruth Williams | January 17, 2018

Researchers map learning-induced chromatin alterations in mouse brain cells, and find that many affect autism-associated genes.

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Upping a gene’s expression in rat brains made them better learners and normalized the activity of hundreds of other genes to resemble the brains of younger animals.

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image: Image of the Day: Fear Center

Image of the Day: Fear Center

By The Scientist Staff | October 26, 2017

A set of neurons in the brain’s central amygdala plays a key role in forming memories of aversive experiences, scientists find in mice.  

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image: Image of the Day: Everybody Needs a Friend

Image of the Day: Everybody Needs a Friend

By The Scientist Staff | August 10, 2017

The protein encoded by the gene that causes Fragile X in humans partners with another protein, dNab2, to alter gene expression in fruit fly neurons.

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