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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Opinion: Share Data for All Diseases

Opinion: Share Data for All Diseases

By | April 28, 2016

Along with his recent $250 million donation to cancer research, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Sean Parker emphasized the importance of data sharing.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2016

March 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: TS Picks: February 18, 2016

TS Picks: February 18, 2016

By | February 18, 2016

Behind the Theranos investigation; data-sharing beyond Zika; NCI to replace some cell lines with mouse avatars

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image: E.U. Revises Law on Data Sharing

E.U. Revises Law on Data Sharing

By | December 22, 2015

The newly amended legislation frees up health data, reversing an earlier provision that made it difficult for broad use of such information in research, registries, and biobanks.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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