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image: Image of the Day: Feather Mites

Image of the Day: Feather Mites

By The Scientist Staff | February 19, 2018

Researchers used scanning electron microscopy to peer at bugs on several hummingbird species.

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image: Image of the Day: Beetle Penis 

Image of the Day: Beetle Penis 

By The Scientist Staff | December 22, 2017

Scientists look to a leaf beetle’s genitals for lessons on improving catheter strength.  

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Chemistry Nobel goes to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, and Richard Henderson. 

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Synaptic connections and a new neuron type emerge in high-res images, which hold promise for mapping the complete connectome.

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image: Doors and Pores

Doors and Pores

By Mary Beth Aberlin | December 1, 2016

The awesome architecture of the gateways to the nucleus

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image: Electron Micrographs Get a Dash of Color

Electron Micrographs Get a Dash of Color

By Ben Andrew Henry | November 3, 2016

A new technique creates colorful stains that label proteins and cellular structures at higher resolution than ever before possible. 

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image: Microscopy’s Growth Through the Years

Microscopy’s Growth Through the Years

By Jenny Rood | October 1, 2016

From confocal fluorescence microscopy to super-resolution and live 3-D imaging, microscopes have changed rapidly since 1986.

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image: First Glimpse at Infectious Prion Shape

First Glimpse at Infectious Prion Shape

By Abby Olena | September 8, 2016

The preliminary structure of the misfolded protein that causes mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease looks like a coiled mattress spring.

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image: Thermo Fisher to Acquire FEI

Thermo Fisher to Acquire FEI

By Tracy Vence | June 1, 2016

In a $4.2 billion deal, the science equipment giant is buying the Hillsboro, Oregon-based electron microscope maker.

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image: Zika Up Close

Zika Up Close

By Anna Azvolinsky | March 31, 2016

A detailed structure of the pathogen highlights its similarities to—and one major difference from—other flaviviruses. 

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