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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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Adding RNA sequencing analysis to genomic sequencing helps scientists uncover mutations likely responsible for genetic disorders they might otherwise miss.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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Researchers report growing a mouse embryo using two types of early stem cells.

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image: Massively Parallel Perturbations

Massively Parallel Perturbations

By | March 1, 2017

Scientists combine CRISPR gene editing with single-cell sequencing for genotype-phenotype screens.

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image: Infographic: Single-Cell CRISPR Screens

Infographic: Single-Cell CRISPR Screens

By | March 1, 2017

See how two new methods track responses to unique genetic manipulations in numerous individual cells in parallel.

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image: Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

Infant Brain Scans May Predict Autism Diagnosis

By | February 17, 2017

A computer algorithm can identify the brains of autism patients with moderate accuracy based on scans taken at six months and one year of age.

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Researchers solve the mystery of 15-year-old mutant ferns with disrupted sex determination.

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