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image: Tiger Hunt, 1838–1840

Tiger Hunt, 1838–1840

By Jef Akst | August 1, 2014

Zoologist John Gould undertook a financially risky expedition to document the birds of Australia—and found some unique mammals in a perilous situation.

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image: Reanimated Chickens and Zombie Dogs

Reanimated Chickens and Zombie Dogs

By David Casarett | August 1, 2014

In praise of weird science at the edge of life

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image: Books on the <em>Beagle</em>

Books on the Beagle

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | July 17, 2014

An online reconstruction makes the library from Darwin’s famed ship more accessible. 

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image: Imaging Intercourse, 1493

Imaging Intercourse, 1493

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | July 1, 2014

For centuries, scientists have been trying to understand the mechanics of human intercourse. MRI technology made it possible for them to get an inside view.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By Bob Grant | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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image: Wheat Whisperer, circa 1953

Wheat Whisperer, circa 1953

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | June 1, 2014

The Green Revolution of the 20th century began with Norman Borlaug’s development of a short-statured, large-grained wheat.

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image: H.M.’s Brain

H.M.’s Brain

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | May 9, 2014

Scenes from the labs that study the unique organ

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image: H.M.’s Brain, 1953–Present

H.M.’s Brain, 1953–Present

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | May 1, 2014

A temporal lobectomy led to profound memory impairment in a man who became the subject of neuroscientists for the rest of his life—and beyond.

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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