The Scientist

» history and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: A Sea Dragon Revealed, 1823

A Sea Dragon Revealed, 1823

By | March 1, 2013

A sharp-eyed fossil prospector and self-taught paleontologist, Mary Anning discovered several extraordinary Mesozoic marine reptiles.

2 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: The Rebirth of DIYbio

The Rebirth of DIYbio

By | March 1, 2013

Do-it-yourself science is likely as old as science itself, driven by an inherent curiosity about the world around us.

1 Comment

image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

2 Comments

image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

1 Comment

image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

0 Comments

image: Slices of Life, circa 1872

Slices of Life, circa 1872

By | January 1, 2013

A master of topographical anatomy, Christian Wilhelm Braune produced accurate colored lithographs from cross sections of the human body.

0 Comments

image: Ancient Pharaoh Was Murdered

Ancient Pharaoh Was Murdered

By | December 18, 2012

DNA samples and CT scans reveal that Ramesses III likely had his throat slashed by his son and other conspirators.

0 Comments

image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

1 Comment

image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Can Young Stem Cells Make Older People Stronger?
  2. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  3. Two Dozen House Republicans Do an About-Face on Tuition Tax
  4. CRISPR to Debut in Clinical Trials