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image: Canned for whistleblowing?

Canned for whistleblowing?

By Megan Scudellari | June 9, 2011

Postdoc forced to leave position after questioning the reproducibility of advisor's data.

6 Comments

image: Medical Posters

Medical Posters

By Edyta Zielinska | June 7, 2011

William Helfand began buying medically themed collectibles in the 1950s when he started working for Merck & Co. Over his 30-year career with the company, Helfand amassed thousands of posters and other old marketing paraphernalia.

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image: One-Man NIH, 1887

One-Man NIH, 1887

By Cristina Luiggi | June 4, 2011

As epidemics swept across the United States in the 19th century, the US government recognized the pressing need for a national lab dedicated to the study of infectious disease. 

27 Comments

image: Control from Without

Control from Without

By Richard P. Grant | May 25, 2011

Editor's Choice in Developmental Biology

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image: Medical Posters, circa 1920

Medical Posters, circa 1920

By Edyta Zielinska | May 25, 2011

William Helfand began buying medically themed collectibles in the 1950s when he started working for Merck & Co. 

0 Comments

image: Primal Fashion

Primal Fashion

By Cristina Luiggi | May 20, 2011

Two sisters -- a developmental biologist and high-end fashion designer -- team up to develop a couture collection inspired by the first 1,000 hours of embryonic life.

3 Comments

Skeleton Keys

By Lewis Wolpert | May 14, 2011

There are a surprising number of unknowns about how our limbs come to be symmetrical.

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image: Ancient Anatomy, circa 1687

Ancient Anatomy, circa 1687

By Cristina Luiggi | April 1, 2011

Seventeenth-century Tibet witnessed a blossoming of medical knowledge, including a set of 79 paintings, known as tangkas, that interweaved practical medical knowledge with Buddhist traditions and local lore.

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image: PET Guerrilla

PET Guerrilla

By Chris Tachibana | April 1, 2011

A former Uruguayan antigovernment rebel is developing a revolutionary diagnostic tool for Alzheimer’s disease.

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image: Taking Shape

Taking Shape

By Richard P. Grant | April 1, 2011

Floral bouquets are the most ephemeral of presents. The puzzle of how flowers get their shape, however, is more enduring. 

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